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Published on August 30th, 2017 | by SOMDParents

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I’m a Parent and I have Back to School Anxiety

What if the kids are mean to her? What if she has no one to sit with at lunch? What if she gets on the wrong bus home? Would it be too uncool to walk her to the bus stop? How am I going to handle not hearing from her all day?

I’ll admit it…I’m a parent and I have back to school anxiety.

I worry that my child will be bullied…or become the bully. I’m worried for her safety. I’m worried that maybe we haven’t talked enough about tricky people. I’m worried about so many more things, too.

I can’t be the only one having these thoughts, right?

Well…even if I am the only one stressing out, I’ve come up with a few tips for myself that I think will help me stay cool, calm and collected as my first baby climbs on the bus and leaves me for a full 6 hours.

I think one of the main things to remember is that while it’s okay (and totally normal) to be nervous about our children going to school, we need to be careful of how we deal with the nerves.

The way we are dealing with our own anxiety about the school year will be easily absorbed by our children. If we demonstrate a hopeful anticipation about the new school year, speaking of new friends they will make or interesting classes they will have, our kids will most likely be inclined the same way. But if we’re vocal about our fears and doubts, such as questioning the capability of a teacher or the negative influences of certain kids, we will be instilling those same fears and doubts in their own hearts and minds.

I plan on pumping her up like school is the new Disney World. She’s going to be so excited that she actually wants to go to bed early on Sunday night! (Probably not…but I’m going to try).

I’m going to give her hugs and kisses before going to the bus stop. I won’t hold her hand–unless she wants me to. 🙂

I know for a fact that I will be tempted to text her (on her “for-emergencies-only” phone) to see how her day is going.

Me to Me: “Don’t do it, girlfriend.”

My parents waited to hear how my day went–I will have to wait too.

Teaching our children that it’s okay to text mom and dad during the school day can (and probably will) create a bad habit of bringing out the phone at unnecessary times and keeping kids distracted when they need to be focusing on school work. Not to mention how bad I’ll feel if she gets in trouble.

I’m also tempted to warn her about the boy who lives down the street who I’ve heard can be quite the little booger.

Me to Me: “Again, don’t do it.”

I know it’s important to let your child explore relationships with children in their class and on the bus. I’m going to remind her that she can always talk to me about things going on at school or on the bus. I’ve talked to my child about appropriate/inappropriate school behaviors and I’m confident she knows what’s right and what’s wrong.

I absolutely plan on sucking up to my child’s teacher.

I mean… create a relationship with my child’s teacher. Your child will be spending several hours a day with this person. It’s important to have an open channel for communication. The better relationship a teacher has with parents, the easier it will be to address any concerns they may have (and then you can both work on helping your child).

Your child will be spending several hours a day with this person. It’s important to have an open channel for communication. The better relationship a teacher has with parents, the easier it will be to address any concerns they may have (and then you can both work on helping your child).

Most of all, I think I need to enjoy watching them grow into little people. Afterall, school is where children find themselves. They learn what they like and don’t like. I can’t wait to hear about the exciting science experiments and to hang the handprint paintings on the fridge.

Oh, and I can’t forget my excitement for taking those first day of school pictures!

 

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